Multi-National Citizenship and Inter-National Security Crises: European Citizenship and the End of the Cold War in Comparative Historical Perspective.

Multi-National Citizenship and Inter-National Security Crises: European Citizenship and the End of the Cold War in Comparative Historical Perspective.

Max Weber Fellows' June Conference, European University Institute, Florence, 13 June 2018

Can we account for the development of multi-national citizenship through the pressures created by inter-national security crises? My presentation at the Max Weber Fellows' June Conference "States, societies and crises across time and space" this year will relate the incipient form of European Citizenship that has existed since the Treaty of Maastricht to the international security crises of the end of the Cold War. European Citizenship appeared in conjunction with the Common Foreign and Security Policy within the European Community. Two main Cold War crises activated this move: the Euro-missile crisis in the early 1980s and the crisis of the end of the Cold War in around 1990. The presentation will review the evidence of the connections between European Citizenship, the Common Foreign and Security Policy, and these security crises. To produce deeper understanding, the presentation will compare this development to other key cases of expansion of multinational citizenship. They include the expansion of Roman citizenship in the Third Centuries AD and the expansion of French citizenship in the French Empire from the First World War onwards. In all three cases, the states that granted citizenship rights to non-national populations were facing decisive security crises. How can this comparison highlight the prospect of fully-fledged European Citizenship?

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